viktor-sbor:

Олешкевич, Иосиф Иванович - Портрет Михаила Илларионовича Кутузова

spookyloop:

antolldubh:

Luisa Casati with a greyhound by Giovanni Boldini, 1908.

A classmate of mine based her final collection on the life of this lady. It turned out wonderful.

weirdvintage:

Former NFL player Rosey Grier liked needlepoint.  He wrote a book about it in 1973. (via Dangerous Minds)

allthingsprimate:

A very useful free online tutorial introducing all sorts of interesting stuff about primate characteristics, classification and other interesting primatological happenings…

art-and-fury:

Dos Muertos con Tortuga Azul -  Francisco Toledo

  1. Camera: Rocky Mountain Ventures Company Flip-Pal 100C

antitacta:

Arnold Böcklin, The Chapel, 1898.

medieval-women:

Late 15th century depiction of a woman’s cadaver tomb.

The image of a beautiful woman can be seen above with her decaying corpse pictured below.

The inscription translates to:

“Take heed of my figure here above and observe how I once was fresh and gay and now am turned to worms’ meat and decay, nothing but foul earth and stinking slime and clay; attend therefore to this disputation written here, and write it wisely in your free heart so that you may acquire some wisdom here by seeing what you are and hereafter shall be; when you least expect it, death will overcome you; when your grave groans, it is good to meditate upon death.”

Source

BL shelf mark: Add. 37049 f.32v

viktor-sbor:

Hans Holbein dJ - Portrait of Robert Cheseman [1533]

archaeologicalnews:

A Jesus statue that has lived an unassuming life in a small town in Mexico for the last 300 years has been hiding a strange secret: real human teeth.

Exactly how the statue of Jesus awaiting punishment got its set of choppers is a mystery.

But the statue may be an example of a tradition in…

strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 
There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.
Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.
(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.
strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 
There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.
Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.
(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.
strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 
There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.
Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.
(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.
strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 
There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.
Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.
(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.

strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 

There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.

Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.

(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.